Farewell February, onward March!

This was the scene beyond my backyard, on yesterday’s last morning of February…

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… and two days ago I spotted these two tiny snowdrops finally making their annual emergence and remembered to capture this somewhat hasty and poorly composed snap of them while outside with my camera to hand…

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Maybe this year I’ll manage something better with the garden! I used to love gardening but for all sorts of reasons I haven’t managed any here enough. These bulbs were brought with me from my previous garden at the family home I left behind. Nothing else survived beyond the first year. Bordering a country park and nature reserve type area there are creatures like moles around and my gardens shown signs of molehills for a few months now, so I wonder if the bulbs get eaten perhaps – or maybe there’s just too much shade and damp.

Here in the Midlands we haven’t really had winter so far, although it was cold today and there had been warnings of ice to look out for, though no sign of any by the time I got myself outside. Until ‘storm Doris’ hit last week – ripping my fences to shreds some more – winter has seemed unusually and eerily quiet and the skies have all too often been jewel shades of blue. I haven’t kept a sky-watch as much as I’d hoped for being quite out of sorts, as is embarrassingly obvious when looking back at my scatty ranting posts(!) Never mind, could be worse and if March winds doth blow, we could still soon have snow comes to mind, (but apparently that rhyme should be ‘The North wind doth blow…’ it’s just not how I remember it).Really, it should be daffodils making an appearance, given that  I did buy some daff-bulbs for this garden once upon a time and as it’s St. David’s Day… but two tiny snowdrops are better than none at all and will have to suffice for now. Maybe next year’s spring garden will be blooming lovelier… in the meantime, Happy March onward, hopefully 🙂

 

The doctor’s wife had executed her lumbering approach to the diplomat with all the elephantine grace of a typical British seduction…

This quote is taken from the nearest book at the time, at the pages that fell open, scanning until I found a point of interest.  It’s the opening line of the first paragraph of page 135 of  Boris Akunin’s ‘Murder on the Leviathan’ ISBN:0-75381-843-4 (a book I’ve not read yet).

The quote interested me both for the opening statement of that paragraph and the linguistic style. (I read after that the author is Russian and the story is set in the late 19th century.)

In the text a conversation follows about the weather and I started drafting a poem based on that popular topic of everyday conversation. I’ll finish it at some point, but here’s part of that draft:

Whatever the weather we’ll ever complain with
our unsticking point to find something to say
strike up a conversation that will drift like the drizzle
or perhaps in a heatwave be flimsy and frizzle
And why such surprise at my love for the rain –
Isn’t it lovely for fresh air again!
– Mostly obtained by a door left ajar,
whatever the weather I don’t walk that far but
I do so rejoice at the sounds and effects
but whatever the weather it leaves us perplexed…

(So that needs some effort maybe another time.)

This is my third response to the writing101 task but was my first idea for a quote to respond to. The first two can be found at my main writing101 blog. I’ve now found that it’s the way these themes display a block quote to not have the grey block background I expected, so I’m fighting a losing battle and have to put up with the tumblr type line instead. Posts in the reader are stripped of theme elements and the block quote text displays correctly there. Maybe I’ll look at changing themes in the next few weeks…